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Inside details of how Saraki spent his N3.75m severance allowance

A former President of the Senate, Bukola Saraki, on Monday confirmed he had received his severance allowance. Inside details.

He put the figure he received at N3,752,727.

Saraki’s Special Adviser (Media and Publicity), Yusuph Olaniyonu, disclosed that 8th National Assembly, led by Saraki as President of the Senate and Yakubu Dogara as Speaker of the House of Representatives, had received their severance allowances but many of their aides had yet to be paid, seven months after the last National Assembly’s tenure ended.

Olaniyonu also admitted that Saraki’s aides had yet to receive theirs.

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He said the former Kwara State governor was working hard to ensure that his aides also got what was due to them.

Olaniyonu disclosed this in a message he posted on his Twitter handle, @Yusupholaniyonu.

He wrote, “This is to inform that ex-SP, Bukola Saraki, has been paid his severance allowance. He got a total of N3,752,727.00.

“He has been working to ensure that his aides get theirs. Inside details.

“And as you know, he had promised to donate whatever the money is to three families that were announced.”

Saraki had in June asked the National Assembly management to distribute his severance allowance to the families of three victims of the insurgency in the North-East geopolitical zone,  including Leah Sharibu’s parents. Inside details.

He also said children of some late senators in need of financial assistance should benefit from the allowance.

A former President of the Senate, Bukola Saraki, on Monday confirmed he had received his severance allowance.

He put the figure he received at N3,752,727.

Saraki’s Special Adviser (Media and Publicity), Yusuph Olaniyonu, disclosed that 8th National Assembly, led by Saraki as President of the Senate and Yakubu Dogara as Speaker of the House of Representatives, had received their severance allowances but many of their aides had yet to be paid, seven months after the last National Assembly’s tenure ended.

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